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Brain Injury Statistics

  • Acquired brain injury is 15 times more common than spinal cord injuries, 30 times more common than breast cancer, and 400 times more common than HIV/AIDS. www.onf.org
  • There are over half a million people living in Ontario with a brain injury. www.onf.org
  • Acquired brain injury is the leading cause of death and disability for Canadians under the age of 45.  www.torontorehab.com
  • More than 11,000 Canadians die each year as a result of TBI. www.torontorehab.com
  • Automobile accidents account for more than 50 per cent of all TBI.   www.torontorehab.com
  • You don't have to be knocked unconscious to sustain a brain injury. Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), also known as concussion, can damage your brain at the cellular level. www.torontorehab.com
  • Young males are twice as likely as females to sustain a brain injury; though in the elderly, the numbers are about the same. www.torontorehab.com
  • After one brain injury, you are at three times greater risk for a second brain injury and eight times greater for other bodily injuries. www.torontorehab.com
  • Injury is the leading killer of Canadian children and youth. 50 per cent of all deaths from injury are from brain injuries. www.thinkfirst.ca
  • Thirty per cent of all traumatic brain injuries are sustained by children and youth, many of them while participating in sports and recreational activities www.thinkfirst.ca
  • A study has found that more than half of Toronto's homeless population has a TBI. Even more concerning, for 70 percent of those surveyed, the first TBI occurred before becoming homeless. www.torontorehab.com
  • 44% of prison inmates in Ontario reported a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI). www.obia.ca
  • 452 people suffer a brain injury every day in Canada. This amounts to one person injured with a traumatic brain injury every 3 minutes. www.nbia.ca/brain-injury-statistics/
  • Brain Injury occurs at a rate of 500 out of 100,000 individuals yearly in Canada. From a population of 33,000,000, that translates to 165,000 brain injuries per year. Of those, tens of thousands of become partially or permanently disabled, and more than 11,000 Canadians die. www.nbia.ca/brain-injury-statistics/
  • 53% of homeless people in Toronto have a history of brain injury. Of the 53% of people who have a history of brain injury 70% sustained a brain injury prior to becoming homeless (Source:  S.W. Hwang, A. Colantonio, S. Chiu, G. Tolomiczenko, A. Kiss, L. Cowan, D.A. Redelmeier, & W. Levinson)
  • 44% of persons with ABI also have mental health issues www.obia.ca

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